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How to Create a Sequence in Pranayama Practice

Each day, there are people out there who get certified to become yoga teachers. The market is saturated with professional yogis from one end to another.

Most of them interpret, internalize, and ultimately deliver what they learned from their instructors. Some of the things they learn are how to sequence a yoga class, including how to sequence pranayama sessions. However, the good news is, you don’t have to be a certified yoga teacher to sequence pranayama sessions for yourself. As a creative person and someone who want to enjoy pranayama and its benefits, you might be challenging to come up with new pranayama sequences. It can be exhausting when you don’t have a clear view of where to start. To come up with even one sequence, it needs practice, patience, and refinement. Here are ways you can come up with your best pranayama sequencing ever. Get the basics right Even if you know all the types of pranayama breathing, don’t over it. Returning to the foundation and getting the basics right is the key to creating a successful pranayama sequence. If you are a new pranayama instructor or you are just trying it out for your benefits, start with the basics. The basic includes breathing and mental concentration. Focus on them. Assess your needs or your student needs Do you have the idea of what you need? Or do you know the type of students in your class?For example, does the class include the elderly? Knowing who you are dealing with will guide you in the right direction of creating a better pranayama sequence. For instance, if your class includes the elderly, you might want to includeDeep breathing techniques that will aid with their breathing and the respiratory system. If it’s for your benefits, then you need to focus on yourself and your needs. Consider what you want to include Most of the time, pranayama is used to help enhance asana practice. Deep breathing is used to coordinate body movements during a yoga class. The pranayama sequence is mostly at the very beginning of the end of a yoga sequence class. Depending on that, some things you need to consider are: • Setting an intention • Focus on warm ups, connection, and deeper breathing • Consider how calm, relaxed, and inner silence you want your students to be. With that in your mind, a pranayama sequence might look like this: Start with kapalabhati pranayama: the Kapalabhati Pranayama or skull shining breathing technique is used for warming up. It is easy for your body. • Move to Dirga pranayama: three-part breath or Dirga pranayama helps build deeper breath, body, and mind awareness. It also helps in connecting your breath, mind, and body. • Move to NadiShodhana: the NadhiShodhana helps regularize and control your breathing. The process helps to clear the breathing passages too. • Move to Bhramari pranayama: this is for calming your mind and body after a session of pranayama and asana sequences. • Finish with Savasana: the Savasana is a corpse pose for surrendering and relaxing, after a 10, 20, or 30 minute pranayama sequence, the corpse pose allows you to relax and be aware of your breathing. While there are other ways of creating a pranayama sequence, the best method to use is to think about the intentions, warm-up, connecting, calming, deep breathing, relaxing, and surrendering. It is the only way you can reach inner silence and become extremely aware of your breath. Also, you can decide to add additional pranayama variation to your sequence. Going with who you work with, how your body feels, the silence, the energy shifts, and calmness derived. There are many ways you can take the pranayama practice to the next level.

Most of them interpret, internalize, and ultimately deliver what they learned from their instructors. Some of the things they learn are how to sequence a yoga class, including how to sequence pranayama sessions. However, the good news is, you don’t have to be a certified yoga teacher to sequence pranayama sessions for yourself. As a creative person and someone who want to enjoy pranayama and its benefits, you might be challenging to come up with new pranayama sequences. It can be exhausting when you don’t have a clear view of where to start. To come up with even one sequence, it needs practice, patience, and refinement. Here are ways you can come up with your best pranayama sequencing ever. Get the basics right Even if you know all the types of pranayama breathing, don’t over it. Returning to the foundation and getting the basics right is the key to creating a successful pranayama sequence. If you are a new pranayama instructor or you are just trying it out for your benefits, start with the basics. The basic includes breathing and mental concentration. Focus on them. Assess your needs or your student needs Do you have the idea of what you need? Or do you know the type of students in your class?For example, does the class include the elderly? Knowing who you are dealing with will guide you in the right direction of creating a better pranayama sequence. For instance, if your class includes the elderly, you might want to includeDeep breathing techniques that will aid with their breathing and the respiratory system. If it’s for your benefits, then you need to focus on yourself and your needs. Consider what you want to include Most of the time, pranayama is used to help enhance asana practice. Deep breathing is used to coordinate body movements during a yoga class. The pranayama sequence is mostly at the very beginning of the end of a yoga sequence class. Depending on that, some things you need to consider are: • Setting an intention • Focus on warm ups, connection, and deeper breathing • Consider how calm, relaxed, and inner silence you want your students to be. With that in your mind, a pranayama sequence might look like this: Start with kapalabhati pranayama: the Kapalabhati Pranayama or skull shining breathing technique is used for warming up. It is easy for your body. • Move to Dirga pranayama: three-part breath or Dirga pranayama helps build deeper breath, body, and mind awareness. It also helps in connecting your breath, mind, and body. • Move to NadiShodhana: the NadhiShodhana helps regularize and control your breathing. The process helps to clear the breathing passages too. • Move to Bhramari pranayama: this is for calming your mind and body after a session of pranayama and asana sequences. • Finish with Savasana: the Savasana is a corpse pose for surrendering and relaxing, after a 10, 20, or 30 minute pranayama sequence, the corpse pose allows you to relax and be aware of your breathing. While there are other ways of creating a pranayama sequence, the best method to use is to think about the intentions, warm-up, connecting, calming, deep breathing, relaxing, and surrendering. It is the only way you can reach inner silence and become extremely aware of your breath. Also, you can decide to add additional pranayama variation to your sequence. Going with who you work with, how your body feels, the silence, the energy shifts, and calmness derived. There are many ways you can take the pranayama practice to the next level.